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New Technologies Pair the Physical with the Digital

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mouser

Digital twinning is one part of the technology road map for Industry 4.0 and the Industrial Internet of Things. A gamut of new technologies must be integrated to work seamlessly together to pair the physical domain with the digital information domain.

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Digital twinning seeks to improve the design and maintenance of physical systems by offering datadriven ways to discretely map these physical systems into digital and computerized replicas of themselves. With the arrival of automation and data exchange, digital twinning could be useful in a myriad of industrial applications.

This new industrial context, where the physical and the digital worlds meet, is known as the fourth industrial revolution—or Industry 4.0. Brought on by the intersection of a host of high-technology electronic and computer systems, the “new way” of Industry 4.0 promises increasing gains, efficiencies, and flexibility. A gamut of new technologies must be integrated to work seamlessly together to pair the physical domain with the digital information domain. Digital twinning is only one part of the technology roadmap for Industry 4.0, as these additional technologies are helping to enable digital twinning for Industry 4.0 to manifest its potential:

• Pairing technologies
• Cyber-physical systems
• Augmented, virtual, and mixed reality
• Artificial intelligence
• Additive manufacturing
• 3D printing
• Digital thread

Pairing Technologies
Pairing technologies are critical to digital twinning and the world of Industry 4.0, as these technologies empower a device or system to find, connect, and communicate with other devices and systems. For example, sensors and the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) products require the ability to find and connect with other devices successfully. Technologies such as Bluetooth®, among others, are employed to make these connections. To accomplish this, connected devices must be able to interrogate other potentially connectable devices successfully. When inquiring other devices, units must be able to ascertain whether they are communicating with a unit that they should be corresponding and exchanging data with. When properly enabled and successful, this accomplishment is called pairing.

Security issues are paramount. Every device should pair only after proper identification has been confirmed to avoid crosstalk or misinformation. Shortcuts may be achieved through programming algorithms that allow the devices to quickly and easily identify other units that they should pair with. Pairing gets accomplished through authentication keys employing cryptography. Pairing works to ensure that the connections stay bonded in a data exchanging relationship between devices and works to prevent an external source from prying into their data exchanges.

Being that flexibility is paramount, units must be able to make and break their pairing quickly and without external, human involvement. Successful pairing may require ongoing communication to keep the pairing active. If one of the units determines that the pairing bond is no longer relevant to its successful operational objectives, it will remove its pairing relationship and present itself available for a different pairing opportunity.

(photo. Mouser Electronics)

Cyber-Physical Systems
The National Science Foundation (NSF) defines cyber-physical systems (CPS) as, “The tight conjoining of and coordination between computational and physical resources.” The critical element in this definition is that it focuses on a system approach— where a set of connected things or parts form a complex whole.

A current example of a CPS is the automated airline flight-control systems. Industry 4.0 requires traffic control, not for airplanes, but for the machines, computers, robots, sensors, and processes that comprehensively work together for its realization. It represents a system of higher order than IIoT, because it sits one level higher in the complexity chain. Where IIoT is concerned with collecting, handling, and sharing of large amounts of data, CPS is focused on ensuring that this large amount of data, collected from multiple systems, gets properly utilized across multiple disciplines that are relevant to the industry involved. The unique dilemmas of any given industry will require engineering expertise to address these specific challenges.

Augmented, Virtual, and Mixed Reality
New technologies are augmenting our reality. They are providing us with the ability to overlay digital content in front of us physically, merging the real with the virtual, creating a mixed reality that should be considered augmented. This gain is allowing engineers to view things in new ways. For example, rather than viewing a DT on a computer monitor, we could view a DT using an augmented reality (AR) headset that enables the users to engage with digital content or interact with holograms.

The use of such AR empowers viewers to have an immersive experience whereby they engage their bodily senses.

Reality-enhancing headsets can create real-time experiences of actual conditions happening in the physical world, by way of experiencing them through a digitized environment. AR could lead to new insights and understandings. Additionally, a DT display could appear in the user’s field of view, making real-time feedback that much more accessible and easy to use.

Artificial Intelligence Technologies
IIoT offers the promise to provide connected data; therefore, useful data must be stored and analyzed. Artificial intelligence (AI) is a solution to how to analyze and successfully handle large amounts of digital data. It helps in allowing digital twinning to become more realized because it promotes value by enabling rapid integration, hybrid integration, investment leverage, and system management and compliance.

Through machine learning, it offers the opportunity to use digital data to model, analyze, train, apply, and infer how best to make decisions. AI is helping to change the traditional perspective of computing, moving it beyond what primarily has been an automating- and scaling-process perspective towards a knowledgebased perspective, via actionable insights. Soon, it will help engineers gather new insights and ways to create value. By using a data-science approach, rapidly powered decisions will enable the generation of further opportunities.

Additive Manufacturing
Additive manufacturing (AM) is a method of production in which 3D objects are built by adding layer-upon-layer of material. AM holds promise because it leads to industries that can address variable demand and produce products that are distributable and flexible. Two areas of AM – 3D printing and digital thread – are advancing to make digital twinning possible.

(photo. Mouser Electronics)

 

3D Printing
3D printing is perhaps the most well-known example of AM. In 3D printing, a printer is programmed to print an object using plastics, metals, or other custom materials with virtually zero lead-time. 3D printing is extremely flexible and eliminates the issues involved in producing objects with large economies of scale. What this means for the future is that you will be able to get what you want quickly—as if walking up to the fast food counter.

Digital Thread
With complex systems, however, AM has been confined primarily to the laboratory because all the systems involved do not operate under a unified system and, thus, are hard to scale. Digital thread promises to change that.

A digital thread is a single, seamless strand of data that acts as the constant behind a data-driven digital system. It activates the potential of AM by allowing a unification of disparate applications by way of their adherence to the thread, which is their source of shared information. A digital thread creates an easier process for collecting, managing, and analyzing information from every location involved in the redesigned Industry 4.0. It enables better and more efficient design, production, and utilization throughout the entire process.

Conclusion
Digital twinning will be a hallmark of Industry 4.0, helping to increase gains, efficiencies, and flexibility for existing products and processes. But digital twinning is just one part of the Industry 4.0 road map. Pairing technologies, CPS, AI, and AM are key to seamlessly bringing together the physical realm and the realm of its DT information and insights. While these technologies are bringing their complexities into the digital twinning equation, ultimately, they promise to enable Industry 4.0 to manifest its potential.

by Paul Golata for Mouser Electronics

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English News

IOTSWC18 will portray an industrial future marked by IoT, IA and Blockchain

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IOTSWC 2018

The fourth edition of the IoT Solutions World Congress (IoTSWC) –international reference event on the innovations of the industrial internet of things–, will bring together, between 16 and 18 October in the Gran Via venue of Fira de Barcelona, 341 exhibitors and 316 speakers from all over the world with the aim of showing the transforming capacity of the IoT in different industrial and business environments, and also show its alignment with artificial intelligence and the blockchain.

IOTSWC 2018

The Leading IoT Industry  Event Barcelona 16-18 October 2018 (image. IoTSWC)

Organised by Fira de Barcelona in collaboration with the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC), IoTSWC has registered a new growth in the number of participating companies, from 240 in 2017 to 341 in 2018, and expects 14,000 attendees from 114 countries. An evolution in line with the widespread deployment of IoT in various industries due to the potential for improvement in efficiency, automation and results.

Therefore, the director the IoTSWC, Roger Bou, is convinced that the 2018 edition will prove that this technology is here to stay, with its rapidly growing presence in industry: “We can see that no longer is IoT a technological revolution waiting just over the horizon; it is a reality that is being implemented ever more often and has an enormous potential to transform all types of businesses and our day-to-day lives”.

In fact, the Gartner consulting firm has predicted there will be 11.2 billion connected things in the world by the end of 2018 –4.159 billion in industry and specific industries alone. In other words, an upsurge of 32% in these areas with respect to 2017. On the other hand, experts also predict 2018 to be the year in which IoT makes a real impact in the market, spurring new business and service models.

New applications and testbeds

The exhibition area will bring together the leading companies in areas such as information technology, software platform developers, hardware manufacturers, security companies, telecommunications and service operators, or industrial automation firms that will show attendees their latest solutions and applications. The following, among others will be among the 341 companies attending: ABB, Cryptoquantique, Dassault Systems, Deloitte, Fiware, Google Cloud, Hitachi, Huawei, Intel, Kaspersky, Libelium, Microsoft, PTC, Relayr, Rigado, SAS, Software AG, Telefonica, Telit, Thinstream, Uptake, Verizon, Vodafone and Wipro.

Among the new applications, the connected winery developed by Vodafone and Bodegas Emilio Moro stands out which, through a Narrowband IoT platform,sensors in the field, Big Data and satellite technology allow to maximise the performance of the winery and minimise the environmental impact of wine production. In addition, the event will have an area dedicated to testbeds, where live demonstrations of innovative industrial internet applications will be carried out. In total 10 examples will be given, among them an intelligent platform to control water quality in Alaska and save beluga whales; an intelligent entrance gate that can be opened when the owner arrives or transform his/her garage into a giant mailbox for the delivery of online purchases; a 3D printing solution to analyse the client’s foot in real time and design and produce custom-made shoes within a couple of hours; and a fully connected and sensorized fire truck.

The 2018 IoTSWC will also be paying tribute to the year’s most ground-breaking and influential projects with their IoT Solutions Awards, which are open to companies and entities all over the world.

Blockchain, Artificial Intelligence and more

On its side, the Conference will bring together the best global experts in IoT technology and representatives of various industrial industries to address the impact of IoT solutions in different environments. Nine core themes have been established for the 2018 edition, as touchstones for the more than 204 scheduled seminars: connected transport, product manufacturing, healthcare, energy and utilities, construction and infrastructure, open industry, enabling technologies, blockchain and artificial intelligence, with these last two having their very own forums.

The following stand out among the 316 speakers: Jonathan Ballon, VP of Intel; Hajime Sugiyama, Overseas Strategic Planning at Mitsubishi Electric; Seb Chakraborty, CTO of British Gas; Alexander Botsor, innovation Project Manager of BMW; Tomi Teikko, Director of Empathic Building of Tieto; Fabian Simmer, Technology Officer at Seat; Cristopher Bailey, director of Innovation and Architecture at Matson; Francisco Torres, Production manager at Pernod Ricard; and John Denning, CTO of Universal Medical, among others.

The technological gender gap and how to overcome it will also be analysed at the congress. IoTSWC will address the leadership role of women in the IoT ecosystem in a session that will have six women leaders in industrial IoT: Jennifer Bennett, Technical Director, Office of the CTO of Google Cloud; Leila Dillon, VP of Global Marketing & NA Distribution at Big Belly; Helena Lisachuk, Director and IoT Global Leader at Deloitte; Beverly Rider, executive vice-president and commercial director of Hitachi; Eva Schönleitner, vice-president of digital societies at ABB; and Adriana Estévez, Executive Director of Transformation and Digital Innovation at Microsoft.

The content and scope of the event was defined in large part thanks to the involvement of the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC), a worldwide organization of over 250 companies and entities related to IoT whose aim is to collectively make strides in the industrial Internet. The executive director of IIC, Richard Soley, emphasizes the standard of the attendees and demonstrations of the live systems at the IoTSWC: “IoT Solutions World Congress remains the main industrial IoT event of the year. It gives attendees the chance to meet the leaders who have been working in the field of the IoT for some time; to listen to the experts, for specific companies and industries to share success stories, and also to provide the opportunity to see the benefits of the industrial internet in action with our focus on fully functional test benches”.

Barcelona Industry Week

The IoT Solutions World Congress forms part of Barcelona Industry Week, a brand which also encompasses two other trade shows, In(3D)ustry From Needs to Solutions, dedicated to additive manufacturing, and Healthio, specializing in health and healthcare technologies. All three events, which create synergies and provide a platform for commerce and knowledge in a wide range of industrial sectors, will take place from 16-18 October at Fira de Barcelona.

 

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English News

Nexperia, New 175°C AEC-Q101 MOSFETs in miniature leadless packages for enable automated inspection

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Nexperia 175°C AEC-Q101 MOSFETs

Nexperia announced the industry’s first AEC-Q101-qualified MOSFETs that are both rated for use at up to 175 °C and are available in the AOI-compatible DFN2020 package (DFN = Discrete Flat No leads). More, the new devices measure just 2 mm x 2 mm, much smaller and lighter than SOT223 and SO8-packages yet with comparable electrical and thermal performance.

Nexperia 175°C AEC-Q101 MOSFETs

Nexperia 175°C AEC-Q101 MOSFETs

Many leadless packages cannot be inspected using AOI techniques, so Nexperia pioneered the development of the DFN2020 package with side-wettable flanks (SWF), enabling Automatic optical inspection (AOI) – a critical automotive industry requirement – to be employed. Packages with SWF are now a proven, accepted solution.

Comments Malte Struck, Nexperia’s product manager for small signal MOSFETs: “The DFN package with side-wettable flanks is gaining significant traction with automotive manufacturers as it saves space and can be automatically inspected. Our new 175 °C parts are being used in under-the-hood applications, especially near the engine or gearbox. The unique offering of an automotive-grade MOSFET that is both qualified to 175 °C and which incorporates side-wettable flanks makes the DFN2020 additionally suitable for a wide range of medium-power automotive applications.”

The new automotive-qualified parts extend Nexperia’s low and medium power MOSFET portfolio. Six 40 V and 60 V devices are available with the higher temperature rating and automotive approval, each with low RDS(on) of between 20 mΩ and 40 mΩ.

More information on the new DFN2020 MOSFETs (BUKxxx) including product specs and datasheets is available at https://efficiencywins.nexperia.com/efficient-products/DFN2020-Automotive-MOSFETs.html

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